Monthly Reports Sgt WJ Hall 1887 - 1889, 1909

 

W.J. HALL

Selected Monthly Reports 1887 - 1909

Monthly Report Nov. 19, 1887

Onion Lake

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

 I have the honor to inform you that since taking over this Detachment from Sergt. Alexander on 23rd inst. (instant), I have had the stable mudded.  That shed and kitchen built.  I had the horses stabled on the 12th inst on 5th inst.  Indian Agent. Mann handed me a warrant for the arrest of an Indian for shooting at a government ox.  Next day, however, at the inquiry, he was allowed to go with a warning.

On 7th inst. I left for Chippewayan Reserve along with _________.  We found that the greater part of the Indians had gone fishing.  I heard no complaints and they seemed contented.  There are a few suffering from scrofula.  The Indians on Onion Lake Reservation are quiet and contented.

The men are in good health and the horses are picking up fast since being stabled.

I have the honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

Sgt. in Charge

                                                           Monthly Report Dec. 30, 1887

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

I have the honor to inform you that on last Tuesday night, the Indian Agent informed me that the Saddle Lake Indians had left their Reserve and came to White Fish Creek to hold a “Council of War” and that they also made threats to come and raid this Reserve.  In consequence of this report, I have put on a double picket and have had the Reserve constantly watched for strange Indians, however, nothing unusual had occurred up till now.

I was last night further informed that although the Indians have gone off their Reserve, it was in consequence of some dispute with the Indian Agent at Saddle Lake and that they still refuse to return on their reserve.

I shall wire you at once, should anything extraordinary occur.

I have the honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

Sgt. in Charge

                          Monthly Report February 10, 1888

 

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of Dec. 30th, I have the honor to inform you that everything has been quiet here since then.

On 30th inst. Several families of the Indians who have been living off the Reserve and who have been fishing and hunting in Frog Lake District were obliged to return to Reserve on account of the security of fish.  There was a report reached the Indian Agent that two families of half breeds who escaped from the Treaty some time ago, were stopping at the little fishery about 25 miles from here and in a starving condition.  The Agent had them sent for and they are now camped on Reserve, drawing rations and working for Indian Department.

On 21st inst. Hon. L. Clarke visited H.B. Co. Store and returned to Pitt same day.  On 17th inst. A party of Indians with interpreter of J.D., left for Battleford to bring a threshing machine. They returned with it on 30th.  The Indians are now engaged threshing grain.  Trader S_______of H.B. Co. and a priest from Cold Lake arrived here on 1st inst.  They report all quiet up there.  As soon as the roads are at all opened up, I will visit this Reserve.  I again long to remind you of the necessity for having this Detachment supplied with hand cuffs and leg irons.

I patrol the Reserve regularly and keep my mind on the look out to see that nothing occurs which would lead me to believe that any mischief is brewing. 

Mine are all well.

Horses in good health and condition.

I have the honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

Sgt. in Charge

Monthly Report March 5, 1888

 

To Officer Commanding
N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 10th inst. I have the honor to state that nothing unusual has since taken place here.  I have had the Reserve patrolled regularly and found the Indians are quiet and contented.

On 26th inst.  Dufresne of H.B. Co. was at Pitt from Island Lake 20 miles N.E. from here reported to patrol to Fort Pitt that there were about 100 Iron Treaty Indians at that place without food and in a very bad state.

I will visit this place as soon as the snow goes off.  There is no trail there at present.

I will visit Chippewyan Reserve next week.

Men are all in good health.

Horses are in good condition and well.

I have the honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

Sgt. in Charge

 

                                                           Monthly Report April 20, 1888

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M.Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report 5th inst. I have the honor to state that no unusual occurrences have ever taken place.

Several Indians and Half-breeds who _________from the treaty in 85 have returned to this Reserve and have again been admitted to treaty.

On the lst inst. It was reported to me that an Indian, Peter Thunder, contemplated holding a _______ or “Souise War dance” as the Indian Agent was absent in Battleford.  I got the Interpreter to accompany me to this man’s house and found out that it was only an ordinary Tea dance.

Two Indians died since my last report.  A Boy on 8th and a girl on 17th

Owing to the state of the trails, I have been as yet, unable to go to either Island Lake or the Chippewayan Reserves.  I hope to be able to proceed to both places in a few days.

Men are all in good health. 

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – May 13, 1888

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M.Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 20th inst. I have the honor to state that nothing unusual has occurred _____since.

I leave here this morning for Chippewayan Reserve and will report on my return.

I have had this vicinity patrolled regularly since my last report.

The Indians are all busily engaged working on their farms.

I would respectfully recommend that Const. D.C. Joyal be removed from this detachment.  His intimacy with the Half Breeds and Indians is not at all commendable and the Indian Agent informs me that he, a few evenings ago, urged the Indians to hold a dance against his “the Agents” wishes.  It is also against my orders that any of the men attend those dances except on duty. 

I would also recommend that Constables H.W. Wheeler and O.P. Redmond be recalled as I do not approve of the manner in which they perform their duties and their removal would be considerable to the good workings of detachment. 

The other men are well suited for the work and I would recommend that they be kept here.

The men are all in good health.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT June 14, 1888

To  Officer Commanding

N.W.M.Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 13th inst. I have the honor to report that nothing unusual has since taken place.

The Indians have got through with their seeding and gardens.  They have put down close on 1000 acres grain. 

This district has been regularly patrolled.

I visited Chippewayan Reserve leaving here on 13th and returning on 19th inst.  I found several Indians at work breaking in ground for grain.  The majority, however, were at Cold Lake fishing.  I heard no complaints.  A new trail is at present being cut out between the two Reserves, which will reduce the distance to about 60 miles.

In accordance with your instructions, I proceeded to Battleford on 25th inst. With constables Moran, Wheeler, Redmond and Joyal.  I arrived back at detachment on 2nd inst. With Const. Jones, Harris and Wilson who replace the men called in.  There is a new church in course of erection at the R.C. Mission and ____________McKay arrived from Prince Albert on 9th inst. To select a site for building for E.C. Mission.  The men are all in good health excepting Const. Harris, who has been laid up with a “Bubo” which he asserts was brought on by the ride from Battleford.  He is recovering and may probably be all right in a short time. 

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – July 13, 1888

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M.Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 14th inst. I have the honor to say that the district has been patrolled regularly during the past month. 

On 16th inst. I proceeded to Frog Lake with Constables Moran, Jones and Marshall as it was reported that the Moose & Island Lake, now treaty Indians, were going to hold a “Thirst Dance” at Little Fishing.  On my arrival there, I found about 100 Indians camped and the dance about to start.  The dance was only kept up 2 nights and 1 day.  I, therefore, returned to Onion Lake on 18th.  I may mention that the Indians were very civic and friendly and in no case could I see symptoms of ill feeling towards the Police.  While at Frog Lake, I had the graves of the victims of the 85 massacre fixed.

On 20th inst. the Indians on this Reserve held a “thirst dance.”  It was kept up 3 days.  6 or 8 Sotto Indians from Turtle Lake attended, also a few from Moose Lake.  Quite a number the Indians here did not attend the dance at all, and in fact, so little interest did they take in it.   Generally that not more than 35 or 40 took any part in the dances and they have pledged their word to the Indian Agent here that it is the last occasion on which they will hold a dance.

I attended the dance daily and have to say that the Indians conducted themselves well and treated myself ________with respect.

On 30th the polling took place here.  Everything passed off quietly.  I kept 2 men on duty during the day.  __________________________

On the 4th inst., when on patrol, I met an Indian (a stranger) he had a pass from ____Fitzpatrick, which expired on 10th _____.  He had an _____off his reserve with him.  I ordered him to return to his Reserve at once.  He left here next morning early.  ___________

_____________________________.

On 5th inst., Inspt. Starnes arrived at Fort Pitt.  I sent the team to bring him here.  He returned again on 8th inst. with Const. Morgan who has been relieved by Constable McCallister.  (This man’s time expires on or about the 20th of Sept.)

On 18th inst. a number of Priests and Sisters of Charity passed here on route for LacLaBiche and Peace River districts.

On the 1st inst., G. Harper arrived at Fort Pitt with remainder of oats.  He had to leave a part of his load on the way and was obliged to return for them; hence the delay __illeburn arrived here with detachment.  Rations same day.

I cannot let this opportunity pass without expressing in the strongest terms the valuable services rendered me by Constable Marshall since I came to this detachment and particularly at the dances that have just been held.  He has acted as my interpreter here and I would recommend that some notice be taken of his services.

Const. Harris is now convalescent and will be fit for duty in a few days.  The other men are in good health.

The horses are in good condition _________.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – August 10, 1888

 

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 13th  ultimo, I have the honor to inform you that the district and Reserve have been regularly patrolled since.

The Indians are busy haymaking and attending to their farms.

On the 14th inst., Bishop Granden and Father Begonais arrived here on route for Saint Albert.

On 21st inst., a schoolmaster arrived here for the Roman Catholic Indian School.

On 2nd inst., Sleamer North West arrived up and returned next morning.  Constables Irish and Nicholson arrived on the boat on pass they returned with her next morning.

On 6th inst., ____Klotz Government astrologist arrived here and is camped on the 4th meridian line about a mile from the barracks.

Since my last report, a woman died on this reserve.

Const. Harris is now all right and at duty.

The men are in good health.  The horses are in good health and condition.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall 

MONTHLY REPORT – Sept. 7, 1888

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Since my report of 10th inst., I have the honor to say that the district and reserves have been regularly patrolled. 

Acting on your telegram of 11th inst., on 13th, I proceeded to Pitt with 3 men to cross Sergt. Mahony.  He did not arrive and I was obliged to come back to Onion Lake.  I went again next day when he arrived and assisted him to cross the river.

The shooting commenced on 15th and finished on 17th.  Sergt. Mahony gave great assistance at the practice and the men paid particular attention to his instructions.

He left here on morning of 18th.  Three of my men, going to Pitt with him and crossing him over the river.  On account of Const. Donnely getting his hand cut by a nail whilst shoeing one of the horses, he was unable to complete his shooting. 

On 20th inst., an Indian “White Face,” arrived on this reserve.  He has lately been liberated from penitentiary where he has put in a term of imprisonment for his participation in the 85 outbreaks.  It is said that he is a very bad Indian and I have a special watch on him as well as a few others who have a bad record.  On same day, Father Le Gendreau, who I am informed, has been sent to N.West by Dominion Government to enquire into the management of the Indians, visited me and made enquiry about the condition of the Indians.  He held a Pow Wow with the Onion Lake Indians at the R.C. Mission.  A number of “Chippewyan” Indians also were present, having been brought here by the Priest at Cold Lake.  The “Chippewyans” returned to their reserve on the 22nd.

On 23rd, Const. Marshall and McFecters, who were on patrol in Frog Lake district, met 3 Indians and a squaw on foot a short distance from Moose Creek.  They had just swum the river from south side and as they were strangers, Marshall questioned them on their business.  They told him that they were going to Cold Lake to fish.

The Indian guide sent by you arrived at 9:00 P.M. on 23rd and from the tenor of your warning, re: Indians, I thought it best to follow up.  The Indians seen by patrol, I therefore, left here at midnight with Const. Marshall and McFecter and patrolled the country thoroughly as far as the telegraph station at Moon Creek, not finding any trace of the Indians.  I left in direction of “Chippewyan” Reserve and must have come across them, had they gone in that direction.  They must, therefore, have gone to Saddle Lake in Edmonton district. 

I would respectively suggest that a Cipher be employed when it is necessary, to use the telegraph on any important business in connection with the Indians. 

I returned to Onion Lake on night of 24th and sent a messenger back to Battleford early next morning.

The Indian Department contemplate bringing in a lot of cattle and having them wintered at Long Lake, about 60 miles N.W. from here.  About 20 Indians have been sent off this Reserve to make hay and put up buildings.

On 15th inst, ____McGibbon, of Indian Department, arrived at agency from Regina and returned on 19th.

On 19th, Father LeGendreau and Bigounious arrived at R.C. Mission from Edmonton and proceeded to Battleford on 21st

On 3rd inst., Father Le_____ from Cold Lake arrived at R.C. Mission.  Reports all quiet at “Chippwayan” Reserve.

Two deaths on this reserve since last report, a woman and a boy.

The Indians are all busy cutting their grain and seem quite contented.

I again, beg to remind you of the necessity for having handcuffs supplied to this detachment.

The men are in good health and the horses are in good condition.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – October 19, 1888

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 7th September I have the honor to report that this Reserve and district have been regularly patrolled since.

According to your instructions I proceeded to Battleford on 17th inst. with Constable McAlister.  I arrived back at Detachment on 26th inst.  Found everything correct on my return.

The house has been shingled and made pretty comfortable.  I have had the stable mudded and propped up so that it will stand during the winter.  I have also had a meat house put up.

The Detachment was visited by Inspt. Morris on 4th inst.

Const. Grant relieved Const. Wilson.

Acting on your telegram of 6th inst., I met the Indian Commissioner at the river with team.  Brought him to the Agency here on morning of 7th and returned with him to river same evening.

On account of the sudden changes in the weather, I have had the horses brought off herd and stabled.

On 9th Sept., Messrs Clint  ______and Gibson arrived here re: repairs on building and returned same day. 

On 12th inst. H.B. Coy moved their store to R.C. Mission.

On 14th inst. _________ and party left here for the East.

On 18th, Gibson, Bird and Meredith arrived from Battleford and commenced work on house.

On 22nd, Cooper finished putting in his hay contract and left for home.

On 29th, 50 head of cattle arrived here for Indian Department.

On 1st inst., Father LeGoff arrived from Chippewayan Reserve and reports all quiet and the Indians contented.

On 4th, Insp. Wadsworth, Indian Dept. arrived here.

On 6th inst., Bishop Grandin arrived from Saint Albert.  The new R.C. Church was consecrated.

The Indians on this Reserve are all working at their houses or plowing.

Men are in good health.

Horses are in good health and condition.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – November 16, 1888

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Since my last report of 19th inst., I have the honor to say that the Reserves and District have been regularly patrolled since.

Acting on your telegram of 2nd inst., re: Bird, I notified him same day to attend court at Battleford on 6th.  He left here same evening.

On 5th inst., I left for Chippewayan Reserve, returning on 11th.  I found that the majority of the Indians were out at the lake fishing.  I heard no complaints and they seem quite contented.  They are catching fish in abundance.  Father LeGoff and Mr. Simpson of H.B. Store accompanied me from Cold Lake.

On 20th inst., Mr. VanKoughmet, clerk of Indian Department here, left for Snake Plains.

On 21st, Mr. Taylor and family arrived here from Prince Albert.

On 27th, Mr. Wadsworth, Inspt. I.D., left here for Saddle Lake.

On 1st inst., rations arrived at the other side of river and were forwarded from there by H.B. transport, owing to teams being unable to cross the river.

On 4th inst., Mr. Bitournay, R.C. School Inspector, arrived here from Battleford.

On 5th, Mr. McRay, Protestant School Inspector, arrived from same place.

On 6th, both schools were inspected.

On 7th, two Indians arrived here from Mistowasis Reserve (Snake Plains).  They had passes signed by Mr. Fitzpatrick for 40 days. 

On 8th, both school inspectors left for Saddle Lake.

On 13th, Father LeGoff and Mr. Simpson returned to Cold Lake.

The Indians on this Reserve are busy at present threshing their grain.  They are quiet and contented.

I would again beg to remind you of the valuable services rendered me by Const. Marshall.

The men are all in good health.

The horses are in good health and condition.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – December 14, 1888

To Officer Commanding
N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir: 

Following my report of 16th inst., I have the honor to state that the district and Reserves have been regularly patrolled since.

On 17th inst., part of the Indians on this Reserve, were paid treaty.  There was some dissatisfaction amongst those who were not paid.  However, when they were informed that if their conduct warranted it, in all probability they would get paid next year.  They went off contented.  The Agent allowed them to hold a dance afterwards and all were well pleased.

On 22nd inst., Indian Agent went to Chippewayan Reserve to pay Treaty to some of the Indians.  I sent Const. McFeeters with him. 

The Indians refused to accept any Treaty unless all were paid. 

The Agent here has sent out a party of Indians to clear the new road to Cold Lake.  When the road is completed, the trip can be made to there in one day.

On 19th inst., I visited the camp at Littlefishery, about 30 miles from here.  The fish are very scarce and the Indians will soon return to their reserve.

Const. Marshall accompanied me as interpreter.  I would again, respectfully request that this man’s extra services be recognized, as I have before stated, he had acted as my interpreter since I came in charge of this detachment.  He is very trustworthy and it would be a pity if his services were ignored. 

The men are all in good health.

The horses are in good health and condition.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – January 10, 1889

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 14th inst., I have the honor to inform you that everything has been quiet in this district.  Since the Reserves have been patrolled regularly, the Indians seem contented.  In fact, I have not heard a single complaint for months.

As I informed you in my last report that the fishing this season was a complete failure.  Those Indians engaged in the pursuit have returned to their Reserves.  Only two families of non-treaty Indians now remain at Littlefishery.

The Moose Lake Indians were in to the Church services at New Years.  They will probably pull through during the winter without assistance.

On 30th inst., Horse Reg. No. 649 met with an accident on coming from water.  A sharp piece of burnt stick entered the hoof at the frog.  I extracted a piece about 2 inches long, but as the horse has been unable to put his foot under him since, I am of opinion that a piece still remains in the hoof.  There is no inflammation or swelling.  I have poulticed the foot daily but it does not seem to make any improvement .  As the horse is a valuable one, I would recommend  _____________________

MONTHLY REPORT – February 8, 1889

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 10th inst., I have the honor to inform you that everything has been quiet in this district since the Indians on this reserve being quite contented and working satisfactorily.

On account of reports of sickness at the Chippewayan’s Reserve, I visited there on 20th inst. and found that measles had broken out amongst them.  There have been 5 deaths within the last month, which are attributed to the disease.  _________returned from the reserve on night of 5th inst. and reports that the disease is only trifling and if the patients would only stop in their houses, they would all right in a few days. 

The District and Reserve have been regularly patrolled during the past month.

On 17th inst., I sent a patrol to Long Lake.  Everything quiet there.

On 19th inst., Inspt. Chalmers and _____Alyn arrived here, inspected Detachment and left on 20th.

On 26th, I left here along with Agent Mann for Chippewayan Reserve and returned on 30th.

On 28th an Indian (Moving Stone) arrived here from (Thunder Childs) Reserve holding pass from Agent Saffron for 60 days.  On same date, a squaw (Emma G___) arrived here from same reserve with a 15-day pass.

On 29th, Father Dauphin left for Chippewayan Reserve and returned on 5th inst.

On 30th, a party of Chippewayan arrived here for rations.

On 3rd inst., Agent Mann left for Chippewayan Reserve and returned on 5th inst.

The men are all in good health and the horses are in good health and condition.  Except horse Reg. No. 649 which is improving.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – March 8, 1889

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 8th inst., I have the honor to report that everything has been quiet here since.

The District and Reserve have been patrolled regularly.

One death on this Reserve since last report.

The Chippewayan Indians who have been sick are all now convalescent.  The report published in Battleford Herald of 9th inst., in reference to these Indians was altogether erroneous.

On 3rd inst., three half breeds arrived from Battleford (2 of them belong to this reserve, but have left).  The Indian Agent ordered them off next day but they did not go.  Consequently the Patrol escorted them off on morning of 4th.

On 5th inst., Trader Simpson and the Priest from Cold Lake arrived here and report the Indians all right again.

According to instructions, I give my men and horses drill every morning.  Will report progress by next mail.

Men are all in good health.

Horses also.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – April 5, 1889

To Officer commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Since my last report of 8th inst., I have the honor to say that the Reserves and District have been regularly patrolled.

On 13th inst., Honbl.______Clark and ______McCauly of H.B. Co. arrived here from Battleford and returned to Pitt same day.

On 15th inst., _____Simpson, H.B. Trader at Cold Lake, arrived here.  He reports everything quiet there.

On 19th inst., Bishop Grandin passed through here en route to Chippewayan Reserve and returned on 23rd.  He reports the Indians entirely recovered from their recent sickness.

On 21st, Father Douphin and Vachon left here for Battleford.

On 22nd, Inspector Morris arrived here.  Inspected Detachment and returned to Pitt Same evening with Const. McFeeters and Harris who were relieved by Const. White and Smith.

On 27th, I left with Const. Marshall for Long Lake where the Indian Dept. have wintered their cattle.  I found everything all right.  The Dept. intend driving their cattle down on this Reserve next week.

Referring to my last report, re: Const. McAlister and Grant – they are now aware that if allowed to remain here, I shall in future, hear no more grumbling.

The men are in good health.

The horses are in good condition.

 have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – May 2, 1889

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 5th inst., I have the honor to state that nothing unusual has taken place in this District since.  The Reserves have been patrolled regularly during the month.  I visited the Indians, who are camped at Frog Lake. Also those camped at Littlefishery.  They have no complaints to make and they are getting good supplies of fish.  A number of Chippewayan Indians went to Battleford during the month with furs.  On account of the sickness on that Reserve during the winter, very little hunting was done and a considerable number received rations from Indian Dept.  The Onion Lake Indians here promise not to hold their yearly “Thirst Dance” this year.

I have never seen them take such an interest in their farms heretofore as what they do this spring.  In fact, they are as contented as Indians can be.  The Agent has no trouble with them.  They complain about the government not providing a mill to grind their grain, however, I am informed that in all probability, a mill will be erected this year.

There are quite a number of children on this Reserve suffering from whooping cough.

The Telegraph Office at Pitt is now closed.  It is hoped that it will be soon reopened.

On 13th , Inspt. Chalmers arrived here.  Inspected detachment and returned to Pitt same evening with Const. Grant, who was relieved by Const. McFeeters.

Inspt. Chalmers also brought horse Reg.No. 1573 to take the place of horse Reg.No. 954, returned to Battleford. 

On 18th, two half-breeds, Jos LaMore and Bro from Battleford passed through here en route for LacLaBiche.  I questioned them and they said they were going to visit relations at that place.

On 20th, quite a number of Indians from Moose and Frog Lake came to attend Easter Services and returned the following day.

On 26th, the Telegraph Office opened.  Left Pitt for Battleford.

The men are in good health.

The horses are in good condition.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – June 13, 1889

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir: 

Following my report of 2nd inst., I have the honor to inform you that everything has been quiet in this District since.  The Reserves and District have been regularly patrolled.

On 2nd inst., a part of the non-treaty Indians from Island Lake, a few wandering “Sottos” and a family of Chippewayan’s assembled at Frog Lake to hold a “Thirst Dance”.  As none of the Indians from the Reserves took any part in it, it was a complete failure.  They danced one day and scattered again.  I attended with Const Marshall as Interpreter and two other men.

I did not visit the Chippewayan Reserve during the month as the road is in such a wretched state in many places that it is dangerous for the horses to travel over.  The Priest from Cold Lake visited here and he reports that the Indians are all out at the Lake at present having got through with their gardens.  There is no sickness amongst them now.  The Indians on the Reserves here have all put in large quantities of grain and vegetables.  I have heard no complaints from them at all lately.

There are only two families of Indians residing at Frog Lake now and as hunting is so bad, they are pretty hard up and I believe will soon have to come on Reserve.

There are only a few families living at Moose Lake at present, however, the hunting and fishing is better in that district and they probably will not come on Reserve for some time.

On 7th inst., the ______from Moose Hill Creek took over the office at Pitt. 

On 11th inst., two children from Industrial School, Battleford arrived here.  They have since returned with 4 others who join the school.

On 16th , ___Lake____ arrived here en route to Moose Hill Creek Tel Station.

On 19th, ___M_______and A. Bird arrived from Battleford enroute to Moose Hill Tel Station and returned to Battleford next day.

On 21st, Agent Mann left for Battleford and returned  on 28th.

On 25th, two months rations arrived here.

On 30th, in response to your telegram, Team ____________sent to Pitt.  Inspt. Chalmers and _____Alyn visited Detachment and left for Battleford same day.

On 2nd inst., the H.B. Co. and Store at Cold Lake closed.  Trades arrived here en route to Pitt on 7th.  On 7th inst., team to Pitt for potatoes, in response to your telegram.

On 2nd inst., Bishop ________arrived here from Edmonton.  Visited E.C. Mission and proceeded to Battleford by the river on 4th inst. 

Const. McAlister and Marshall leave with B.B. and team for Battleford today on pass.  The remainder of the men are in good health.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – July 10, 1889

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 13th inst., I have the honor to inform you that everything has been quiet in this district since.  The Reserves have been regularly patrolled.  The Indians are quiet and contented.  There have been 3 deaths on Reserve during the month (all children).

The crops in this district are a complete failure for want of rain.  The Indians have close on 700 acres grain put down.

There is no upland hay this side of the River and I would respectfully recommend that tenders be put out for hay required on this detachment as soon as possible, as it will be next to impossible to get the quantity required in a short time.  The Indian Dept. has, a great number cattle to be wintered here and the Indians start in haying next week.

W. Simpson, late trader H.B.Co., has taken up a ranch near Stoney Lake.

On 14th inst., Const. McAlister  and Marshall left with team and  ___Board for Battleford on pass and returned on 19th.  Team is in good condition.

On 17th, ____Barker and the Priest from here visited the Chippewayan Indians.  They report all the men fishing and hunting.  Nearly all have built houses at Cold Lake, having left their Reserve.

On 29th, a half-breed, named Burk, arrived here with eggs and butter for sale.  After disposing with his wares, he returned to Battleford.

On July 1st,  ______Mann gave the Indians tea and tobacco with permission to hold a dance.

On 2nd, _______Wild and _____ arrived from Battleford with cattle for _________ - Onion Lake and Saddle Lake.

On 5th, Indian Agent issued beef to Indians, first time this season.

On 6th, Sergt. Major White arrived here, inspected Detachment and left next day.   Team and B Board met him at river, according to your instructions.

Const. Tpurway relieved Const. Donly recalled.  Horses are in good condition.  Men are in good health.

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – August 23, 1889

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 10th inst., I have the honor to state that the district and reserves have been regularly patrolled.  Nothing unusual has occurred and everything has been quiet since.

The Indians are all busy hay making.

On 15th July, Patrol visited Chippewayan Reserve, found all quiet.  A great many of the Indians were away fishing and hunting.

On 14th, a party of Indians and Half-breeds from LacLaBiche passed here en route for Battleford looking for work.

On 17th Indian Agent Kramer left here for Battleford.  Inspt. Wadsworth of Indian Dept. arrived here same day.

On 18th, Inspt. Wadsworth visited Frog Lake to report on condition of machinery of mill abandoned in 85.  It is reported if practicable, that a mill will be built on the river adjacent to this reserve.

On 20th, ____Garson of H.B. co. passed here from Prince Albert en route to Edmonton.  Same day a party of Half-breeds from Battleford passed en route to Edmonton for rafts.

On 21st, schoolteacher for Indian Protestant School, arrived from Battleford.  On same day a party of Chippewayan Indians arrived here with shingles for I. Dept.

On 22nd, Indian Agent returned from Battleford.  Two months rations for Detachment arrived by Freighters Goodwin and Marchand today.

On 24th, R.C. Priest from Cold Lake arrived.  Reports everything quiet on Chippewayan Reserve.  Returned next day.

Acting on your telegram of August 1st, Detachment proceeded to Pitt en route to Battleford.

On 2nd August, Sergt.  Woodward relieved me.   Myself, and men returned on 11th inst.  Found everything correct.  Sergt. Wooward, Consts. Parsons and Fields left for Battleford same day.  During my absence, in Battleford, Dr. M. Adam, vaccinated a considerable number of children on this reserve.

On 12th August, Cinnamon Brothers of Bresaylor passed en route to Moose Hill Creek to put up hay for Tel Office at that place.  They also contemplate wintering their stock in vicinity of Egg Lake. 

 On 13th, Dr. M. Adam arrived from Battleford on a sick call.  Returned next day.  Indian Agent left for Battleford same day.

On 17th, Patrol visited Moose Lake district.  The half-breeds in this district seem to be pretty well off ______complains.

The men are in good health.  The horses are in good condition. 

I have the Honor to be

Sir

Your Obedient Servant

W.J. Hall

MONTHLY REPORT – September 19, 1889

N.W.M. Police, Onion Lake

To Officer Commanding

N.W.M. Police, Battleford

Sir:

Following my report of 23rd inst., I have the honor to inform you that everything has been quiet in this district since.  The Indians on the Reserve being quite contented and working satisfactorily. 

On 26th inst., ___Mann visited Chipewayan Reserve.  He reports everything quiet there.

On 28th ____W. McKay and family arrived at Pitt to take charge H.B. Co. Post.  On same day ____Gibson arrived here and returned to Pitt same evening. 

On 4th inst., teams left here for Frog Lake to bring down machinery for mill to be built at this place for use Indian Dept. On same day, freight arrived from Swift Current for Indian Dept.

On 5th, ____Laurie D.L.S. arrived here from Battleford to survey claim for H.B. Co. at this place.  He returned to Battleford on 6th inst.

On 6th, Millwright arrived from Regina to put up mill.  He has been laid up sick since his arrival here.

On 8th, ________Taylor arrived back from Prince Albert.

 

ONION LAKE

July 20, 1909

 

Description of remains of W.C. Gilchrist.

Massacred 2nd April, 1909 at Frog Lake.

W.C. Gilchrist, aged 26 years, was a cook and was cooking for the gang who were putting up the mill on Frog Creek for the Indian Department.  As soon as the Indians commenced firing, Gilchrist made a dash for it and caught up to George Dill and both fell together, being shot, square through the heads.  There was no sign that Gilchrist had been mutilated after he was shot.  All the bones were intact.  I placed them carefully in a coffin and they are now in the cemetery at Frog Lake.

W.J. Hall

Sgt. in Charge

 

ONION LAKE

20TH July, 1909

 

Description of the remains of George Dill.

Massacred 2nd, April 1885 at Frog Lake.

George Dill was a trader at Frog Lake and made a dash for it when the shooting commenced and succeeded in getting nearly a mile away when he was over taken and shot in the head.  And when he fell, the Indians clubbed him, breaking one arm.  He was buried as he fell.  No coffin, all his remains were recovered and placed in coffin and buried in cemetery. 

Dill had Indian blood in him – Saulteaux.  One foot was encased in boot. 

W.J. Hall

Sgt. in Charge

ONION LAKE

20TH July, 1909

 

Description of remains of John Delaney.

Massacred at Frog Lake, 29th March, 1885.

John Delaney was the millwright for this Indian Department at Frog Lake.  He does not seem to have made a run for it when the Indians turned loose.  He was shot near the Mission where hostilities commenced.  A bullet pierced his head and both legs were broken.  When scull was picked up, a bullet fell out of it, evidently, the one that caused his death.  His remains had also been thrown in a cellar and the house set on fire, but was raised by the volunteers and interred in the graveyard.  Both hands and feet had been burnet off.  The rest of the bones were carefully picked out and placed in coffin and laid alongside the other victims. 

W.J. Hall

Sgt. in Charge

ONION LAKE

20TH July, 1909

 

Description of remains of John Gowanlock.

Massacred  29th March, 1885 at Frog Lake.

Gowanlock had the contract for putting up the mill for the Indian Department on Frog Creek.  He was killed near the Mission ______was shot through the head and breast and was thrown in the cellar of a shack, which was set on fire.  His legs as far as the knees and his arms as far as the elbows were burned off.  The remains were taken out of the cellar by the volunteers and buried in the graveyard in 1885.  I had to take the remains up, so as to place them alongside the others.  All the bones were got with the exception of those burned.  They were placed in a coffin and interred beside the other victims.

W.J. Hall

Sgt. in Charge

ONION LAKE

20th July, 1909

Description of Charles Gouin’s remains.

Massacred at Frog Lake,  2nd April, 1885.

Charles Gouin, was assistant to ______Quinn, the Indian Agent and met the same fate as the Agent, being shot in the same doorway and thrown in to the cellar and the house set on fire.  Very little of his remains were found, there being only pieces of bones mingled with earth, which resembled broken egg- shells.  However, I gathered up all I possibly could and placed them in a coffin and buried them in the cemetery.

W.J. Hall

Sgt. in Charge

ONION LAKE

20th July, 1909

Description of John Williscraft’s remains.

Massacred at Frog Lake 2nd April 1885

Williscraft was bookkeeper for this Indian Department at Frog Lake.  When shooting commenced, he ran and was making for some rush about half-mile away but was dropped at the edge of the brush by a bullet through the head.  One arm and one leg were broken, apparently with an axe.  He was buried, as he fell –no coffin.  I got all the bones and placed them in coffin and buried them in the cemetery.

W.J. Hall

Sgt. in Charge

 

 

 

 

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